11.27.2014

Review: Big K.R.I.T — Cadillactica

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There continually remains a negative understanding of southern rap, as it is largely constructed as void of quality lyricism, radio-friendly, nonsensical, and ultimately simple. Within this sentiment, certain are deemed transcendent of the sub-genre, with Houston based UGK and early-to-mid Lil Wayne not only catering to a larger demographic, but garnering critical acclaim and praise throughout relatively all outlets. In the last few years, Big Krit has been placed within the rare Southern-but-respectable rapper paradigm, with his 2012 release Live from the Underground earning rave reviews and building suspense for any future major label release. Two years and a mixtape later, Big Krit released Cadillactica on November 10.

The intro to Cadillactica, “Kreation,” sets the tone for a different Krit experience; the southern drawl remains, yet the production is more electronic and noisy, vaguely similar to Pusha T’s My Name is my Name or a tapered down Raider Klan release. Essentially, Krit is trying to produce an expansive sound and illustrate his evolution as an artist, which he does moderately well. In particular, the eponymous track “Cadillactica” is a highlight of the first half of the album, with Krit rapping quickly and confidently about his motivations over a futuristic, synth-driven beat by DJ Dahi.

The first half of the album remains strong with the track “King of the South” serving as a catchy yet guttural experience with Krit boasting: “Kick that south flow that you can’t get. Try to fuck the world but my dick won’t fit. My bitch like ‘Krit, motherfuck they feelings. You wanna be king, gotta claim that shit.’ I’m talkin’ ’bout off with they heads.” In execution, “King of the South” serves to be the end of side a, with the second half of the album returning to Krit’s southern roots.

The remaining productions are full of twangy soul and funk driven instrumentals akin to an 8ball and MJG or Scarface record, which theoretically contrasts Cadillactica’s aims; the album plays as an experience attempting to transcend southern rap, yet through production and lyrical content fails to do so. There is a definite attempt at shedding southern stereotypes, and results are mixed. Krit’s lyricism is fine, but suffers on occasion as it comes across as a formulaic, conscious attempt to produce these vivid, yet obscure, poetically driven verses.  In a noticeable attempt at a refined lyrical experience, Krit declares on his opening track: “These hands of mine can hold the weight of planets. Allow me to use the hues of lunar cools to paint a canvas. Of explosions and vibrant emotions that we know we could. Explore the outer most with no risks. Even though we know we should. You are the ocean, I am a mountain.” This isn’t to say that Big Krit’s lyrics are bad by any means, it just doesn’t feel quite natural. The same can be said for the productions, as the album lacks cohesion, problematically weaving from electronic synths to funk, without ever truly settling down.

Big Krit is a victim to success. As all of his previous releases have received general acclaim, a newfound pressure is present; Krit has been good, consistent, solid, occasionally great, and as a result, expectations have risen. Cadillactica is another step, but it isn’t groundbreaking. In this sense, Krit fails to fully escape the “southern rap” moniker he holds, and although Cadillactica is worth a few listens, it doesn’t reach the hollowed territory of a transcendent southern-turned- classic rap album. Essentially, the album strives to be Outkast’s Stankonia or Speakerboxx/The Love Below, yet plays like Idelwind.

Bob says 7/10

 
 
 
 

11.23.2014

WOBC-LFSB: 103 & 105

Check out these videos from the latest Live from Studio B sessions. Don’t forget to catch the show on air, Sundays 2-3 pm!

11.22.2014

The Grape’s WOBC Spotlight: Movies, Sounds, and Tracks

Movies, Sound, and Tracks airs Tuesdays, 10-11 pm.

Movies, Sound, and Tracks airs Tuesdays, 10-11 pm.

WOBC is super excited to announce a new partnership with The Grape, Oberlin’s alternate student newspaper. Every other week, the Grape will feature an article about a show on WOBC. In the weeks between issues of The Grape, we’ll still feature a show of the week on our website. The inaugural spotlight, authored by Sam Hume, focuses on Jackie Milestone, pop director and host of “Movies, Sounds, and Tracks,” airing Tuesdays, 10-11 pm.

As part of the Grape’s mission to be the ultimate source of alternate news, we cover a wide range of the different artistic and cultural experiences on campus. Both to provide you, dear reader, with valuable insight on the many goings on in Oberlin, and more importantly, to help spread awareness about the many great artists on this campus and their varied crafts. From their lair atop the roof of Wilder, the people of WOBC asked us, in our dusty basement at the Grape, if we were interested in publishing a series of spotlight articles on their many wonderful DJs and hosts. The answer was, of course, a yes. For this edition’s WOBC spotlight I chose to focus on Jackie Milestone, who DJ’s Movies, Sound and Tracks, a show that focuses on music in film (and it airs every Tuesday from 10-11PM, give it a listen!).

Jackie, a junior, is a veteran WOBC DJ, having been a part of the program since she was a first semester freshman. She is now one of the station’s pop directors, a far cry from DJing a show from 3-4 Sunday morning. Similar to class and housing registration Freshmen get last pick when it comes to time slots, “paying their dues,” to the station. Though according to Jackie, “It’s just part of being in the station, I find doing the show[s] so much fun that it just pays off.” And rightly so, you have to crawl before you walk after all. When she started out, Jackie’s lineup was mostly folk rock from the 60s and 70s though through the semesters she has branched out to new things.

“I like [the show] that I have now because it allows me to pull from basically anything.” Jackie’s music choices are eclectic, though of course each show follows a central theme. Two weeks ago the theme was Disney. Though I did enjoy Disney movies in my youth (like many other youngsters) I had thought my appreciation for them had dropped off. Listening to Jackie’s show while frying some tofu, I found myself appreciating the breadth of the studio’s work. From the Jazzy lyrics of the Jungle Book to lines more reminiscent of the Blues from Robin Hood. Of course the Lion King’s fantastic soundtrack by Elton John took the cake (at least for me).  Jackie “love[s] dabbling in all sorts of different genres.” Some shows have been dedicated to those “cult classics” we all know and love while others focused on certain genres like 80s pop rock.

Not all WOBC is chatting on air or dropping some sweet tunes; some of Jackie’s “middle years” were taken up with work groups. At WOBC work groups are open to people even if they don’t have a show and give some relief to aspiring DJs who might not be able to make their precarious times. The groups are divided between Studio B, who handle recording, and various genre work groups that go through and listen to all (seriously, if you haven’t you should check it out some time, WOBC has a shitload of cool music and they get more all the time) of the music that comes into the station deciding which of it is worth keeping. According to her this year has been, “a little more organized and focused…people seem to be really on top of their stuff.” It definitely shows.

-Sam Hume

11.21.2014

International Workgroup Presents: Songs We’ve Been Listening To, Pt. 2

Malian singer Khaira Arby.

Malian singer Khaira Arby.

Part 2 of International Workgroup’s playlist – a real Japanese pop star, a virtual Japanese pop star, an up and coming British singer of Ghanaian & Nigerian descent, and a legendary Malian singer with a U.S backing band.

1. Kyari Pamyu Pamyu (Japan) – Pon Pon Pon

This video is everything.

2. Hatsune Miku (Japan) – Sharing the world (“live” on David Letterman)

22nd century J-pop meets 20th century American TV.

3. Lola Rae (Nigeria’Ghana/UK)

There will be dancing.

4. The Sway Machinery featuring Khaira Arby (US and Mali)- Gawad Teriamou

Khaira Arby, also know as the Nightingale of the North hails from Mali.

11.16.2014

WOBC Zine Submission Deadline Extended!!

The deadline for the WOBC Zine has been extended until the end of November. We want playlists, art, essays, opinions comics, interview, show listings, concert reviews. Whatever works! Send submission/questions to promo@wob.org by November. Submissions boxes will also be in Mudd and the station, if you want to drop off a physical copy. Leave your name and email on copies that you want returned!

Stick-Institute-Zines

11.16.2014

International Workgroup presents: Songs We’ve Been Listening To, Pt. 1

The international workgroup playlist – part 1 – is here! Check out: a Belgain rapper whose video has more than 200 million views; beautiful Korean folk pop; toetapping “electro-cumbia” from Mexico; a 60s French classic; and breathtaking Russian throat singing.

1. Stromae (Belgium) – Papaoutai

Belgium’s finest rapper and pop auteur takes a trip to the uncanny valley.

2. Lee Lang (Korea) – 이랑 잘 알지도 못하면서 (translates to “You Don’t Really Know”—a full translation is available here)

Korean singer-songwriter makes thoroughly charming folk music from circular melodies.

3. Afrodita (Mexico) – Guerros

Duo from DF, Mexico – Irreverent electrocumbia pop

4. Jacques Dutronc (France) – Cactus

Classic French rock.

5. Huun Huur Tu (Tuva, Russia) – Chiraa-Khoor

Throat singing distinctive of folk music from the Mongolian regions of Mongolia, Inner Mongolia (China) and Tuva (Russia).

11.14.2014

APPLY TO THE FALL 2K14 COVER BAND SHOWCASE

Hey, you!

Do you want to play live music but have had trouble finding an outlet? Do you crave fame and/or glory? Do you routinely write in the margin of your notebook bad band name puns (Geezer, Velvet Underwear, Def Jeopardy)?

Then apply for the COVER BAND SHOWCASE! Applications are due on November 19, and the fun will take place on December 12.

Please submit applications to music@wobc.org including: band name, songs you will cover, members of band, and instruments played. In order to make this event as inclusive as possible, we ask that individuals only apply for one cover band.

May Jovi be with you.

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