03.07.2012

Retrospective: “You Keep Me Hangin’ On”

“You Keep Me Hangin On,” written by legendary Motown production and songwriting team Holland-Dozier-Holland, was originally recorded by The Supremes in 1966. Since then it has been become one of the most often covered songs in the Supremes’ catalog.

After running across the 1969 Vanilla Fudge single in the vault I was inspired to check out some of the numerous re-recordings of the song. As you can see, few live up to the high bar set by the Supremes’ version.

The Supremes – You Keep Me Hangin’ On (1966)

The Vanilla Fudge – You Keep Me Hangin’ On (1967)

Rod Stewart – You Keep Me Hangin’ On (1977)  // cool vid

Ken Boothe – You Keep Me Hangin’ On (1983)

Kim Wilde – You Keep Me Hangin’ On (1987)

Reba McEntire – You Keep Me Hangin’ On (1996)

Tom Jones – You Keep Me Hangin’ On (BBGermany Remix 2008)  // sick remix

Glee – You Keep Me Hangin’ On (2010)  // horse vid, chill

– Will Floyd

02.25.2012

Album Review: Mark Lanegan Band – Blues Funeral

Mark Lanegan Band - Blues Funeral

Mark Lanegan Band – St Louis Elegy

Blues Funeral is the seventh album released by Mark Lanegan this year. It has been a long awaited album since his success with his 2004 album, Bubblegum. After his long touring with the Soulsavers, The Gutter Twins and former Belle and Sebastian member, Isobel Campbell, Lanegan has created a wonderful set of tunes worth the wait. Lanegan had previously released six solo albums, which mostly compromised of blues and acoustic based music. Of course, his deep, scratchy vocals are still evident on his newest effort. Working with well-known producer and musician, Alain Johannes, in addition to working with a guitar, Lanegan experimented with keyboards and a drum machine, which is something he has not done before. Blues Funeral opens a new realm for Lanegan, as he still keeps his signature style of writing intact. Lanegan talked about how for his latest album, he used a “lot of the elements” from music that influences him. He stated that he wanted to make a record that he himself would listen to personally and listed The Gun Club’s Miami, Joy Division’s Closer, and Roxy Music’s Country Life as his primary influences.

Blues Funeral kicks off with its first released single, “The Gravedigger’s Song”. What is most evident in this song is Lanegan’s use of the drum machine, although Jack Irons plays percussion on the entire album. It’s upbeat and serves as the perfect start for the album.
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01.21.2012

FROM THE VAULT: Tom Waits – Blood Money

Tom-Waits-Blood-Money

In 2002, Tom Waits released Blood Money along with Alice. Both albums are based off of plays that were adapted by theater director, Robert Wilson. Blood Money is based off the socio, political play called “Woyzeck”, which was originally written by the German poet, Georg Buchner in 1837. The premise of the play revolves around a true story of a German soldier who is driven to insanity by strange army medical experiments and problems with infidelity, which ultimately drove him to murder his lover. The songs that Waits wrote with his wife, Kathleen Brennan, were for an avant-garde production of “Woyzeck”, which was directed by Robert Wilson. The play was premiered in November 200 at the Betty Nansen Theater in Copenhagen, which won the Danish rendition of the Tony award for “Best Musical”.

Tom Waits – Another Man’s Vine

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12.06.2011

FORM THE VAULT: R.E.M. – New Adventures in Hi-Fi

REM - New Adventures in Hi-Fi

As the last album to feature founding member and drummer, Bill Berry, New Adventures in Hi-Fi, released in 1996, has the most diverse set of songs by R.E.M. The process of the album is unusual in that most the songs were written while R.E.M. was on tour for their 1994 album, Monster, and were recorded live with eight-track recorders. As a result, most of the album centralizes itself on themes of motion and travel. This album mixes the country sound found in their previous albums, Out of Time and Automatic for the People, with more of a rock feel found on Monster and Lifes Rich Pageant. I believe that although critics had mixed dispositions about the album, New Adventures in Hi Fi is one of R.E.M.’s best efforts, especially from the 1990s.

The album begins with the pleasant groove of “How The West Was Won and Where It Got Us”. This is probably the catchiest tune from the album with its highly recognizable and memorable piano staccato riff. Michael Stipe’s yell at the end of each chorus gives the song most of its power. The next song takes the listener to a fast pace run with “The Wake-Up Bomb”. It carries itself with a hard rock guitar riff. “New Test Leper” plays with religious themes with more of an acoustic sound. The band takes another turn to a light groove with “Undertow”. The bass carries this song as the guitar riff guides it towards its climatic chorus. This song also uses religious references that are subtle, in which Stipe contemplates about life. The chorus is surprisingly in a major key as Stipe yells “I’m drowning….” The most well-known song off this album is “E-Bow The Letter” and for a good reason. It is one of the most charming tracks from the album with Patti Smith featured as a guest vocalist behind Stipe’s echoes of sadness.
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11.13.2011

FROM THE VAULT: Pearl Jam – Binaural ca. 2000

Pearl Jam - Binaural

No one could really know what Pearl Jam would come up with next with the releases following their 1994 album, Vitalogy. Binaural, released in 2000, follows Pearl Jam’s tradition of attempting to explore new grounds with their music. Binaural was the first album to include the drummer, Matt Cameron, who at the time was a former member of Pearl Jam’s grunge contemporary, Soundgarden. The departure of Jack Irons inevitably lead to a change in the band’s music. However, albeit an amazing drummer, Jack Irons departure did not leave Pearl Jam in the dust. Matt Cameron brought a new ingredient, making Pearl Jam more focused and stronger than before. Cameron ultimately added a new back bone to the band without any sacrifice. At this point, Pearl Jam was ahead and matured from their grunge years during the early 1990s. Maintaining what makes Pearl Jam unique, they continued their string of experimentation with the introduction to binaural recording, which attempts to use 3-D stereo sound in order to place the listener in the same room as the performers of the music. Binaural recording is used for the intent of listening to it with headphones, rather than stereo speakers, hence the use of the technique, “Dummy head recording”. Pearl Jam also integrated sounds of psychedelic and post-punk sounds into this album. In addition to Pearl Jam’s progression to new grounds, bassist, Jeff Ament, and guitarist, Stone Gossard, contribute their own lyrics to the album, making it the second album that singer, Eddie Vedder, gives lyrics rights to other band members since their previous album released in 1998, Yield. Along with the new experimental sound to the instrumentation, the lyrics featured in Binaural are darker and focus on social criticisms. Lyricist and singer, Eddie Vedder explained that the album is about the importance of freedom in humanity and how people should be comfortable with their own existence. Risking the loss of fans, Pearl Jam wanted their audience to listen with new ears without any expectations.
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10.19.2011

FROM THE VAULT: Vinyl Mix 10/19/11

Dennis Wilson in 1977, maybe looking a little sad, but wearing a nice shirt.

More selections from the WOBC vault courtesy of the Vinyl Workgroup.

Dennis Wilson – River Song

Thin Lizzy – Wild One

Sandy Denny – Dark The Night

The Allman Brothers Band – Blind Love

Oliver Lake – Trouble

Tinsley Ellis – Can’t You Lie

Blondes – Lover

10.16.2011

FROM THE VAULT: Vinyl Mix 10/16/2011

Wussup world. Another year of vinyl mixes…all songs are ripped from albums which can be found in the vaults.

Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band – Dropout Boogie

The Go-Betweens – Bachelor Kisses

Bert Jansch – Fresh as a Sweet Sunday Morning

Daddy in his Deep Sleep – Alone with Daddy

Lew Furfey – Cops Ballet

Blind Willie McTell – Got to Die (Edit)