12.04.2012

From the Vault: Happy Mondays

 

The single ‘Loose Fit’ from the Happy Mondays came out in 1990.  Off of the label Elektra Records, the acid house band combines influences of funk, house, and dancehall hits.  Check ’em out in the WOBC vault!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQCrgu8Am2U

 

 

12.02.2012

Vinyl Workgroup Finds

We picked this stuff from the vault this week:

These ladies are from New Orleans. They sounds like the Andrew Sisters. They are friends (see below).

Here is a sample of their music. This song is called Mood Indigo.

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This band is one of those bands from the 80s who made a website and never updated it. We like them anyways. They are kind of folk rock-ish. This picture is called Hanukkah Nights (see below).

This is a song by Antietam. Here- it is called Camp Folk.

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Exceedingly strange punk funk band out of Boston. “Dogzilla is made of up five people, each one of a different sex.” Here are some stills from their music video Lunch With Ed. Everything that happens in this video is crazy (see below).

Here is a sample of their music: The Sphinx.

11.25.2012

From the Vault: Cosmic Psychos

 

The Cosmic Psycho’s album Blokes You Can Trust is sheer gold from deep in the WOBC vault-mine.  The Australian punk band is hanging by their threads to keep playing.  Their ’91 album, off of Amphetamine Reptile Records was the first with guitarist Robbie ‘Rocket’ Watts, who died in 2006.

This one’s Angst with a capital A for sure. There’s a lot of easy, definitely relatable lyrics here. But these hard-drinking vulgarians from Melbourne are closet poets. In “Elle”, the last track on the album, we get ‘I see you standing on the boat, shedding your clothes to stay afloat’, while the back vocalist groans, ‘Break my arm, break heart, tear my shirt’.

The rest is a little less romantic.  ‘Back at School’ is nice, moshy and grimey.  Jump up and down for ‘Just good to be back at school’.  Tons of shredding.  ‘Loser’ and ‘Nightshift’ follow suit.  Come into WOBC’s vault for a listen!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-v7nRiUMoU

 

11.18.2012

From the Vault, vol. 274

WOBC has a lot of records. It’s a well-known fact that if you line up all the vinyl the WOBC vault has, it will circle the equator three times. If you stacked all of the records on top of each other, you will reach the exosphere. The weight of all of our vinyl will crush the Eiffel Tower. The combined speed of the RPM of our vinyl is enough to go back in time. So what to do with all these records? Well, sometimes they sit around on the third floor of Wilder — lonely… unseen… untouched. Sometimes, though, they get taken out and played on air! And sometimes, they’re corralled and examined and analyzed by “Vinyl Workgroup,” or “those geeky losers.” Well here’s a quick sampling of stuff you might not know is in the WOBC vault…

So the vault has, among other things, an incredible selection of Anthony Braxton records, something like 10 or 15 of his most important stuff from the 70s and 80s. This is fantastic. “For Alto” was maybe his first big record, from 1968 — it’s more than an hour of just him and a saxophone. An alto saxophone. I’m bad at writing about music I like, so I’ll just give it to you. This one is “To Pianist Cecil Taylor.” (We have some of Cecil in the vault too.)

Anthony Braxton – To Pianist Cecil Taylor

There’s this section at the end of all the pop stuff that’s called “Anthologies.” Mostly it’s record companies in the 60s and 70s sending samples of their artists to WOBC. Warner and Reprise happened to do one of these in 1971 called, for whatever reason, “Non-Dairy Creamer.” There’s usually a reason these people needed some extra publicity on the labels’ parts, but it’s always a great artifact. Here’s a prog-rock band called “Curved Air,” and it quickly becomes pretty obvious that the song is called “It Happened Today.”

Curved Air – It Happened Today

Clarence Clemons made a solo album. He actually apparently made quite a few, and of course in the vast ocean of mostly anonymous, mostly mediocre 80s rock the vault contains it would stand to reason that you’d find a Clarence Clemons solo album. This one is from his debut effort, with “The Red Bank Rockers.” This song’s called “A Man in Love,” and yeah, it kind of sounds like Springsteen. It’s not bad.

Clarence Clemons – A Man in Love

WOBC DJs — there’s more in the vault that awaits your discovery!

11.09.2012

Vault Vinyl Jamz: 11.08.12

Leon Russell – Midnight Lover

Van Morrison and Your Dad

Tyron Davis – In the Mood

Smooth, baby.

Steve Martin – King Tut

Lubricated Goat – Spoil the Atmosphere

Rahhh

 

Love,

Vinyl Workgroup

05.30.2012

Album Review: Chris Cornell – Euphoria Morning


Chris Cornell, lead singer and songwriter of the grunge group Soundgarden, which broke up in 1997, came back to his audience with music that was much more different than what he had ever done before. His first solo album, Euphoria Morning, released in 1999, gave way to a new beginning for this incredibly talented singer after parting ways with his previous band. This album is nothing like his work with Soundgarden. By the time Soundgarden’s Down on the Upside was released in 1997, it was becoming a bit noticeable that the singer was looking for something different. Chris had already shown his aspirations as a solo artist with his contributions to Cameron Crowe’s film, Singles, in 1992. What this record showcases is not the typical sludge metal, grunge sound that is familiar in Cornell’s past. This is more of an experiment which pulls in influences from psychedelic rock. Euphoria Morning is not an over produced arena rock album like Soundgarden’s records, albeit they are all excellent. Cornell’s singing is more organic and much more intimate here. This is not to say that Euphoria Morning is not a big production, but it sounds more natural. Natasha Shneider and Alain Johannes from the band Eleven, are key figures on this record as both of them assist with all the production and most of the musical accompaniment. Euphoria Morning is a record that invokes several different moods and explores a vast landscape of emotion with superlative songwriting.

01 Can’t Change Me
05 When I’m Down
09 Sweet Euphoria
11 Pillow of Your Bones

Read More →

05.25.2012

Dusty Digs form the Jazz Vault

Tucked away  in the far corner of WOBC’s music library lies the hallowed WOBC Jazz Vault, a sprawling history of 80s bebop revival, commercial blues, Count Basie’s entire career, explicit photos of Herbie Mann, and a few rare gems. The WOBC Jazz Work Group, a spritely group of young Oberlin jazzheads, dove headfirst into the vault to seek out the dustiest of the dusty, the rarest of the rare. Here’s what we came up with:

 

Oliver Nelson, Blues and the Abstract Truth

Released in 1961 on Impulse! records, this record is an absolute classic. Nelson’s lush horn arrangements are in a league of their own on this hard-swinging collection of entirely blues compositions. The lineup on this date is unbeatable: Paul Chambers, bass; Eric Dolphy, sax, flute; Bill Evans, piano; Roy Hanes, drums; Freddie Hubbard, Trumpet; George Barrow, sax.

 

 

 

 

Keith Jarrett, The Koln Concert

It is rare that commercial success aligns itself with the highest artistry, but the recording of Keith Jarrett’s legendary concert of solo improvisations in Koln, Germany is a standout exception. It’s one of the highest-selling jazz records of all time, and for good reason: Jarrett’s uninhibited emotion and limitless outpour of ideas on this record is simply stunning.

 

 

 

 

 

Jimmy Heath, Love and Understanding

Tenor sax man and multi-instrumentalist Jimmy Heath was at the forefront of the movement towards a new funkified spirituality in early 70s jazz. Love and Understanding is a classic example of Heath’s compositional style during this period, not to mention a killer band backing him up: Curtis Fuller, trombone; Bernard Fennell, cello; Stanley Cowell (Oberlin alum), piano; Bob Cranshaw, bass; Billy Higgins, drums.

 

 

 

 

Yusef Lateef, The Diverse Yusef Lateef

Brother Yusef Lateef: woodwind virtuoso, master composer, spiritual guru. This album is a great summary of Lateef’s style: it’s got swing, funk, free improv, and some deep spirituality. Yusef plays a menagerie of  instruments on this date: tenor sax, flute, bamboo flute, Chinese globular flute, Buddhist flute, tamboura, Chinese cymbals, and other percussion instruments. In the depth of his influences and originality, Lateef is virtually unmatched, especially on this Atlantic recording from 1970.

 

 

 

Roland Kirk, Funk Underneath

This is the beloved, playful, seriously swinging sax man Rahsaan Roland Kirk at his best. This record features the  masterful hammond organ playing of Jack McDuff, supported by Art Taylor on drums and Joe Benjamin and bass. Most of the tracks on the record are Kirk originals, showcasing the soulful and bluesy tendencies of both his solos and his compositional style. Recorded in 1961, Funk Underneath is a surprisingly progressive and groove-oriented release from Prestige Records, and a rare pull from the cavernous depths of the vault.

 

 

 

If you’re in the station anytime soon, look in the jazz bin to check out all of the above records and more rare vinyl finds. In this digging session, we only scratched the surface of WOBC’s jazz collection. If you want constant access to all this tasty wax, you should apply for a jazz show in the fall and sign up for the workgroup!

-Adam Hirsch