Category Archives: Music

Music Reviews from WOBC staff. Includes Best New Music and From the WOBC Vault.

Review: Jonny Greenwood – Norwegian Wood

An unusual project: a feature film adaptation of the Haruki Murakami novel of the same name. Dealing with sixties alienation, societal hypocrisy, sexuality, growing up, depression, and free (?) love, Tran Anh Hung’s film, released in 2010, is noticeably more subdued than one might expect. It focuses on the story of Toru, his life as a student in sixties Tokyo, his emotional turmoil of losing a friend to suicide, being adrift in the world, and his relationship with two different women, the melancholic Naoko, and the confident Midori.

The soundtrack is equally restrained (and surprisingly, has no Beatles’ references or anything), being equal parts staid, quietly dramatic, understated, with some songs by the ‘krautrock’ late-60s band CAN, providing an interesting contrast to the string heavy, acoustical pieces by Jonny Greenwood. Ah yes, Greenwood, multi-talented musician, composer, member of Radiohead, composer for such movies as Bodysong and There Will be Blood… But, the real gems of this album are not the orchestral pieces, but the guitar pieces. They are quite elegant in composition and tone. Melancholic and meditative, they vanish as quickly as they appeared. This would not be such a problem if the orchestral pieces were not so pallid. At best, they are ethereal and pretty (Watashi wo Toru Toko wa Watashi Dake wo Totte Ne), but mostly they are so unassuming that they gradually just drift off into nothingness. This may have been the point. Occasionally, there is a burst of energy, such as on the track Naoko ga Shinda, a Penderecki-esque piece with tense, dissonant voices under a solo violin.

BBC Concert Orchestra/Greenwood – [Naoko ga Shinda]

Greenwood – [Toki no Senrei wo Uketeinai mono wo Yomuna]

Quartertone Bloom is a stunner though, with the greatest thematic resolution and cosmic yearning that is prevalent throughout the album. It is a culmination of themes that could exist as a stand-lone concert piece (if it was longer). The ending is particularly gorgeous, reminiscent of Poulenc, Dukas, and Messiaen. The sense of ecstatic, sublime, romanticism bursts forth but is absent everywhere else on the soundtrack. That is the greatest weakness of the album. Despite its attempts at musically portraying un-fulfillment, anxiety, love, sensuality, and melancholy, it ultimately falls short. How appropriate, given the story’s tone of young ennui.

Greenwood – [Quartertone Bloom]

-Robben Muñoz

FROM THE VAULT: Phosphorescent—Pride (2007)

03 Wolves

04 At Death, A Proclamation

07 Cocaine Lights

Pride is 41 minutes of loneliness. It’s like listening to Skinny Love on codeine. Slow, quiet and unsettling in every way. Interludes of noodling guitars underscore Phosphorescent’s multi-layered vocal harmonies to create a sound unlike anything that I’ve ever heard, and when the melodies come in, they’re slow and reserved. Phosphorescent is the working moniker for Matthew Houck, a singer-songwriter from Athens, Georgia. His fourth album, Pride, evokes feelings of solidarity through this contrast of slow, driving melodies and subtle interludes of drones and hisses. The beauty of the album is that it cannot be pigeonholed into the genres that it swings between, folk and ambient, because it captures both so perfectly. The record is hopeful in its tone, engaging with its pop melodies and unnerving with its ambience, to create a unique sound that makes even the toughest traveler nostalgic of their home.

Pride is an album for The Soul-searching Traveler. The person who embarks on journeys to far away lands and returns immersed in new knowledge. The traveler will find solace in the strength of Houck’s vocals and lyrics and a rhythm to travel to in the thumbing bass drum. “Wolves,” arguably the best track on the album, is the perfect example. The song opens with soft, nylon strings strumming a simple melody, until Houck enters with a youthful voice asking for protection from the wolves from his mother. “Mama there’s wolves in the house / Mama, they wont let me out. / Mama, they’re mating at night / Mama, they wont make nice.” As the lone traveler bounces from city to city, from hostel to homestay, the cry for domestic protection is the traveller can relate to. Then, the home-sickness sets in. Continue reading FROM THE VAULT: Phosphorescent—Pride (2007)

NEW MUSIC: M. Ward – A Wasteland Companion

M. Ward – Clean Slate

M. Ward has returned with his seventh and latest release, A Wasteland Companion, released today, April 10. He is one of the great musicians among contemporary folk and indie music. M. Ward is mostly known for his last two releases, Post-War from 2006 and Hold Time from 2009 and his work and collaboration with actress and singer Zooey Deschanel and their band, She & Him. M. Ward has a very distinctive style of playing and singing that resonates a warm atmospheric sound that would captivate any listener. A Wasteland Companion is one of his best efforts yet that captures a sweet sound that compliments his usual vintage tone. This album introduces a more mellow sound than his previous records that reflect off some of his work with She & Him. Continue reading NEW MUSIC: M. Ward – A Wasteland Companion

McFabulous – Oh, Interesting

I recently discovered this 2010 EP released by McFabulous, the alter-ego of a certain Chicago-based producer and Oberlin alum. Now, don’t get me wrong, I had heard of McFabulous before. He’s practically a legend. But he’s allusive. I once stumbled into a few s(l)ick beats labeled “McFabulous” floating around the iTunes library of an iMac in an internet cafe in Teaneck, NJ sometime in 2008. But there was no way to tell if those were ginuwine or not. So, it was to my surprise and amazement to find this gem surfing the internet just this year.

If you’re not already sold on McFabulous based on the cover art then I suggest you just walk away right now. It only gets better. Really, you just gotta listen to “Hobby Shop.” Beware, you might have to listen on repeat.


Click here to check out the rest of the EP.
-Will Floyd

New Music: Teen-Age Riot Records

The No Tomorrow Boys - Jimmy, Matt, and Danny

When Matt Miller went to Oberlin he was Music Director and Punk Director here at WOBC and played in so many rock ‘n’ roll bands that he was basically responsible for almost all the fun I had in Spring ’09. Now two of his bands’ 7-inch records have arrived to the WOBC punk vault! Both released on Teen-Age Riot, they are killer additions to our collection.

Based in Portland, Oregon, the No Tomorrow Boys remember why seventies punk rockers wanted to look like greasers. They have hairdos! They have matching leather jackets! And they’re punk as heck.

No Tomorrow Boys – (Do The) No Tomorrow Twist

No Tomorrow Boys – Neanderthal For Your Love

The Miniskirts and the Itchies were a couple of Matt’s Oberlin projects, and these tracks were recorded here in town. “That’s Cool, That’s Trash,” fronted by the Miniskirts, is one of my favorite songs of all time not just because of lines like “There ain’t gonna be no kissing on the dance floor (that’s trash!)/There ain’t gonna be any dancing on the kissing floor (that’s cool!),” but also because punk rock with lady vocalists that is especially for dancing rules. As a matter of fact, all of these songs are especially for dancing and we should all dance to them.

The Miniskirts – That’s Cool, That’s Trash

The Itchies – Shake It Down

Stay sick, turn blue,

-Stella Byrne

Review: Alain Johannes – Spark

 

Endless Eyes

Alain Johannes, who is most commonly known for his work with Natasha Shneider and Jack Irons of the band Eleven, recently released his solo debut, Spark. Johannes is a well-known guitarist and producer in the music industry as he has worked with various prominent groups including, Queens of the Stone Age, Them Crooked Vultures, Mark Lanegan and Chris Cornell. Johannes gives a wonderful and impressive collection of tunes that together are under thirty minutes. He uses a diverse number of instruments including his homemade cigfiddle, a harmonium and a contrabass guitar. Spark is dedicated to Johannes former wife and band mate, Natasha Shneider. Throughout this short album, he explores ways in which to deal with the loss of his partner. It’s a touching reminder that sometimes, we are lost without the ones who are close to us, but find a way to move on with that love.

Continue reading Review: Alain Johannes – Spark