11.27.2014

Review: Big K.R.I.T — Cadillactica

20atmyv
 
There continually remains a negative understanding of southern rap, as it is largely constructed as void of quality lyricism, radio-friendly, nonsensical, and ultimately simple. Within this sentiment, certain are deemed transcendent of the sub-genre, with Houston based UGK and early-to-mid Lil Wayne not only catering to a larger demographic, but garnering critical acclaim and praise throughout relatively all outlets. In the last few years, Big Krit has been placed within the rare Southern-but-respectable rapper paradigm, with his 2012 release Live from the Underground earning rave reviews and building suspense for any future major label release. Two years and a mixtape later, Big Krit released Cadillactica on November 10.

The intro to Cadillactica, “Kreation,” sets the tone for a different Krit experience; the southern drawl remains, yet the production is more electronic and noisy, vaguely similar to Pusha T’s My Name is my Name or a tapered down Raider Klan release. Essentially, Krit is trying to produce an expansive sound and illustrate his evolution as an artist, which he does moderately well. In particular, the eponymous track “Cadillactica” is a highlight of the first half of the album, with Krit rapping quickly and confidently about his motivations over a futuristic, synth-driven beat by DJ Dahi.

The first half of the album remains strong with the track “King of the South” serving as a catchy yet guttural experience with Krit boasting: “Kick that south flow that you can’t get. Try to fuck the world but my dick won’t fit. My bitch like ‘Krit, motherfuck they feelings. You wanna be king, gotta claim that shit.’ I’m talkin’ ’bout off with they heads.” In execution, “King of the South” serves to be the end of side a, with the second half of the album returning to Krit’s southern roots.

The remaining productions are full of twangy soul and funk driven instrumentals akin to an 8ball and MJG or Scarface record, which theoretically contrasts Cadillactica’s aims; the album plays as an experience attempting to transcend southern rap, yet through production and lyrical content fails to do so. There is a definite attempt at shedding southern stereotypes, and results are mixed. Krit’s lyricism is fine, but suffers on occasion as it comes across as a formulaic, conscious attempt to produce these vivid, yet obscure, poetically driven verses.  In a noticeable attempt at a refined lyrical experience, Krit declares on his opening track: “These hands of mine can hold the weight of planets. Allow me to use the hues of lunar cools to paint a canvas. Of explosions and vibrant emotions that we know we could. Explore the outer most with no risks. Even though we know we should. You are the ocean, I am a mountain.” This isn’t to say that Big Krit’s lyrics are bad by any means, it just doesn’t feel quite natural. The same can be said for the productions, as the album lacks cohesion, problematically weaving from electronic synths to funk, without ever truly settling down.

Big Krit is a victim to success. As all of his previous releases have received general acclaim, a newfound pressure is present; Krit has been good, consistent, solid, occasionally great, and as a result, expectations have risen. Cadillactica is another step, but it isn’t groundbreaking. In this sense, Krit fails to fully escape the “southern rap” moniker he holds, and although Cadillactica is worth a few listens, it doesn’t reach the hollowed territory of a transcendent southern-turned- classic rap album. Essentially, the album strives to be Outkast’s Stankonia or Speakerboxx/The Love Below, yet plays like Idelwind.

Bob says 7/10

 
 
 
 

11.21.2014

International Workgroup Presents: Songs We’ve Been Listening To, Pt. 2

Malian singer Khaira Arby.

Malian singer Khaira Arby.

Part 2 of International Workgroup’s playlist – a real Japanese pop star, a virtual Japanese pop star, an up and coming British singer of Ghanaian & Nigerian descent, and a legendary Malian singer with a U.S backing band.

1. Kyari Pamyu Pamyu (Japan) – Pon Pon Pon

This video is everything.

2. Hatsune Miku (Japan) – Sharing the world (“live” on David Letterman)

22nd century J-pop meets 20th century American TV.

3. Lola Rae (Nigeria’Ghana/UK)

There will be dancing.

4. The Sway Machinery featuring Khaira Arby (US and Mali)- Gawad Teriamou

Khaira Arby, also know as the Nightingale of the North hails from Mali.

11.18.2014

Concert Review: Alt-J @ The Fillmore in Detroit

British rockers Alt J in concert

British rockers Alt J in concert

Two WOBC DJs, Ariel Miller and Rachel MacLean, report on a recent concert visit…

I’m not sure what sort of crowd we expected at Alt-J’s show in Detroit on November 10th. I guess we expected more college-aged folks with undercuts, but the crowd seemed to be in their late 20s-30s with pretty average hair cuts. Maybe it was because they were tall and took up the most space, but there seemed to be a lot of tall white dudes. Suddenly we started to worry if we were, in fact, edgy and cool, or just as mainstream as the chicks in front of us obscuring our view with their flower crowns.

Some Mikky Ekko fellow opened for Alt-J. Things Mikky Ekko is into: how high he can sing, listening to himself sing, rain/leaving/love/smiles/the sun. His beat was fairly predictable, as were his lyrics. There was nothing about him that really pushed boundaries. We were bored, and this reinforced our sense of superiority. We were cool. Mikky Ekko was not.

Alt-J! Alt-J! Alt-J finally came on, accompanied by scores of e-cigs and vaporizers booting up around the room. Triangle hands all around!  ∆∆∆∆∆∆∆∆

Alt-J is great. Their new album, This Is All Yours, is indistinguishable from their old album, An Awesome Wave, but we don’t even care because both have the same weird, catchy, danceable sound. At the concert, they played it safe, balancing the old and the new. It would have been nice to actually see them through their obscuring shroud of fog and lighting, and even nicer to see some energy or movement. But overall, they sounded just like they do on record, which was good enough for us.

11.16.2014

International Workgroup presents: Songs We’ve Been Listening To, Pt. 1

The international workgroup playlist – part 1 – is here! Check out: a Belgain rapper whose video has more than 200 million views; beautiful Korean folk pop; toetapping “electro-cumbia” from Mexico; a 60s French classic; and breathtaking Russian throat singing.

1. Stromae (Belgium) – Papaoutai

Belgium’s finest rapper and pop auteur takes a trip to the uncanny valley.

2. Lee Lang (Korea) – 이랑 잘 알지도 못하면서 (translates to “You Don’t Really Know”—a full translation is available here)

Korean singer-songwriter makes thoroughly charming folk music from circular melodies.

3. Afrodita (Mexico) – Guerros

Duo from DF, Mexico – Irreverent electrocumbia pop

4. Jacques Dutronc (France) – Cactus

Classic French rock.

5. Huun Huur Tu (Tuva, Russia) – Chiraa-Khoor

Throat singing distinctive of folk music from the Mongolian regions of Mongolia, Inner Mongolia (China) and Tuva (Russia).

11.12.2014

CMJ Top 10 11/11/14

SBTRKT rounds out the list at #10.

SBTRKT rounds out the list at #10.

WOBC DJ’s favorite new releases this past week:

1. Sophie – Lemonade b/w Hard [ed. note: fresh off a ‘Sco show!]

2. Priests – Bodies and Control and Money and Power [ed. note: second time this year in the top 10]

3. The Roots – …And Then You Shoot Your Cousin

4. Flying Lotus – You’re Dead! [ed. note: second time this year in the top 10]

5. Hundred Waters – The Moon Range Like a Bell [ed. note: also fresh off a ‘Sco show]

6. Inter Arma – The Cavern [EP]

7. Dean Blunt – Black Metal

8. Mr Little Jeans – Pocketknife

9. Iceage – Plowing into the Field of Love

10. SBTRKT – Wonder Where We Land

11.10.2014

Top 5 Adds

Dean Blunt's new album "Black Metal" is #5 on our top 5 adds this week.

Dean Blunt’s new album “Black Metal” is #5 on our top 5 adds this week.

While you wait expectantly for the CMJ Top 10 tomorrow, here are 5 new releases from the past week sure to excite:

1. Deerhoof – La Isla Bonita [ed. note: yeah that’s right, they have a new album!]

2. Cooly G – Wait ’til Night [ed. note: Hyperdub!]

3. Paperhead – Africa Avenue [ed. note: featuring Oberlin album Ryan Jennings!]

4. Scott Walker and Sunn O))) – Soused [ed. note: insanely unexpected & insanely good collaboration]

5. Dean Blunt – Black Metal [ed. note: also check out his album Redeemer from last year]

11.09.2014

“If punk is the ultimate anti-establishment scene, why is it still run by all these white men?”

7094826a-2748-4872-98a1-2fb7ff323463-620x372

That’s the title of this incredible piece in The Guardian by Alyssa Kai, former WOBC DJ and Oberlin alum – you’ve got to check it out here.