11.12.2012

Cover Band Showcase Follow-Up: Shakir A’neal

The cover band showcase was great. Not only was it fun, but the bands seemed to have genuinely put some work into actually sounding good. I can’t say I had any favorites, but the Shakira cover band, Shakir A’neal sounded awesome.

Maxim and Carla, hanging out.

After the show, I caught up with lead singer, Carla, and lead Guitarist, Maxim, and asked them a few cover band related questions:

Why did you choose to cover Shakira and how did the band name come about?
Max and Carla were sitting out in wilder bowl, postponing our midterm studying, and as soon as we started talking about the cover band show case, we immediately thought of Shakira. We knew the energy was right. There were really no other options, just Shakira. It was perfect. We asked a few passerby if they’d be in the band. None of them ended up in the band. But they were all extremely interested.
The band name is just a hybrid between Shakira and Shaquille O’neal. There’s really not much to it.

What songs did you cover and why did you pick those particular songs?
We covered “Wherever, Whenever,” the Spanish version of “Objection (Tango),” and “Hips Don’t Lie,” which medley-ed into “Underneath Your Clothes.” The first song was a given. For the second song, we thought it was necessary to do a true Spanish ballad, given that our singer was well versed in Spanish, and Shakira herself is practically fluent. “Hips Don’t Lie” was a crowd pleaser. And then Max was hanging with a Shakira fan late into the night at Tank, and she expressed the need for “Underneath Your Clothes.”


What was your general impression of the cover band showcase and how did you feel about your performance?

Wow! Wow! Wow! We wished that we could be more aggressive in the venue, but given the floor was nearly breaking, we understood that this wasn’t an option. Other bands were great. [We] couldn’t hear any vocalists. Maroon Four killed it. We really messed up “Hips Don’t Lie,” but the crowd was too drunk to care, so that was awesome.


Will we see Shakir A’neal again?

You’ll definitely see us hanging out on campus. And we might not all be together again, but individually you’ll definitely see us.

11.11.2012

Staff Picks: Program Director

here’s a sampler of things ive been listening to lately. enjoy!

-arielle

Flying Saucer Attack- My Dreaming Hill

Beat Happening- Collide

My Bloody Valentine- Slow

Round of Applause- Wacka Flocka Flame

Arvo Pärt- Cantus In Memory of Benjamin Britten

The Germs- The Other Newest One

11.09.2012

Vault Vinyl Jamz: 11.08.12

Leon Russell – Midnight Lover

Van Morrison and Your Dad

Tyron Davis – In the Mood

Smooth, baby.

Steve Martin – King Tut

Lubricated Goat – Spoil the Atmosphere

Rahhh

 

Love,

Vinyl Workgroup

11.07.2012

TOP 30 11/6


The Top 30 is a weekly section of the WOBC blog where we highlight the 30 most-played new albums each week. Check out what our DJs are spinning!

1 KENDRICK LAMAR good kid, m.A.A.d city
2 JASON LESCALLEET Songs About Nothing
3 SIC ALPS Sic Alps
4 NEIL YOUNG & CRAZY HORSE Psychedelic Pill
5 BILL ORCUTT Why Does Everybody Love Free Music But Nobody Loves Free People?
6 OMER AVITAL Suite Of The East
7 OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW Carry Me Back
8 SWANS The Seer
9 CLAMS CASINO Instrumental Mixtape 2
10 HEAD BOGGLE Headboggle
11 BAND OF HORSES Mirage Rock
12 CHRIS COHEN Overgrown Path
13 AVETT BROTHERS The Carpenter
14 GRIZZLY BEAR Shields Warp
15 FLYING LOTUS Until The Quiet Comes
16 MOON DUO Circles
17 PURITY RING Shrines
18 ANGEL OLSEN Half Way Home
19 MOUNTAIN GOATS Transcendental Youth
20 TALK NORMAL Sunshine
21 DAN MELCHIOR The Backward Path
22 ANIMAL COLLECTIVE Centipede Hz
23 TRAXMAN Da Mind Of Traxman
24 CULT OF YOUTH Love Will Prevail
25 ROBERT TURMAN Flux
26 NON/BOYD RICE Back To Mono
27 TEENGIRL FANTASY Tracer
28 KAKI KING Glow
29 TAMARYN Tender New Signs
30 DUM DUM GIRLS End Of Daze

11.06.2012

Pop Picks 11.6.2012

Election day is today, and we’re all writhing with excitement. Also, we listened to some good music today. Here’s the newest pop additions to the Pop WOBC Vault:

Prince Rama // Top Ten Hits at the End of the World

Party at the end of the world! Everyone’s invited! Prince Rama’s greatest hits album got tarred and glittered and then electrocuted itself during a bubble bath. Huge, glamorous production — so obsessed with itself…deprived of oxygen from too much hair gel. A+++

Onuinu // Mirror Grazer

Surprise! Chillwave is still not over. And I am totally OK with it, and all of that funky/fuzzy synthy bouncy poppy-pop that this CD brings to the party.
FYI: pronounced “on you in you,” which makes sense, sort of.

Why? // Mumps, etc

Partial raps, good beats, good vibes.

Peace.

11.06.2012

Office Hours Picks – Station Manager and Music Director Make Choices

Deacon Blue – Real Gone Kid

Brainbombs – After Acid

Fishmans – Night Cruising

Jim Pepper – Newly-Weds Song

Lust For Youth – Cover Their Faces (Live)

Lou Reed – Like A Possum

11.02.2012

Review: Kendrick Lamar’s “good kid, m.A.A.d. city”

I’m really into rap right now, probably a little too much. After last month’s A$AP Rocky concert, I can’t stop listening. It got to the point that my friends had to sit me down and remind me there is more music to be heard than solely Danny Brown. I realized I had to broaden my pallet; there is such a thing as overplaying an artist. But while staying within the confines of my beloved rap genre, I began to expand, listening to various other artists. In my expansion, I began listening to Kendrick Lamar. As his 2010 album, Section 80, was critically acclaimed, immense hype surrounded his latest release, good kid, m.A.A.d. city. I had to give it a listen. And though I can’t call it groundbreaking, “good kid, m.A.A.d. city” is nonetheless a great album.

Kendrick Lamar – Swimming Pools (Drank)

Although I don’t agree that “good kid, m.A.A.d. city” is the instant classic it has been deemed by various music publications, it still is ultimately a success. The production is varied, encompassing pseudo- electronica and hard guttural beats, with Lamar effectively
navigating his way lyrically through each song. The lyrical content on the album is varied, and while contained mostly in today’s usual rap themes of women, money, poverty, there is creativity in all he says. The sole problem I have with “good Kid, m.A.A.d. city” is that it forces the listener to ask, is Kendrick Lamar really that good or is hip-hop today just that bad? Rappers are often given too much credit; if an artist manages to say something mildly creative or original they are excessively praised. Kendrick Lamar embodies this to an extent. Although in “good kid, m.A.A.d. city,” Kendrick is able to avoid the Lil Wayne pitfall of rhyming “hoes” with “hoes”, overall he struggles to say something new. His lyrics are indeed good, but occasionally formulaic: while Kendrick strives for so-called “intellectual hip-hop,” lines like “I pray my dick get big as the Eiffel tower/so I can f*ck the world for 72 hours” don’t help his cause.

With my “Lil Wayne is killing hip-hop” rant aside, I need to emphasize that, while I don’t view “good kid, m.A.A.d. city” as wildly original, it still is to me the best rap album of the year.
I have no clue what that says about the hip-hop genre as a whole, but regardless, “good kid, m.A.A.d. city” is definitely worth a listen.

-Robert Cornell