All posts by Vinyl

Finds from the WOBC Vault: March 2014

Did you know that the WOBC station houses thousands of vinyl records? 12″ and 7″, 33 and 45, pressed in 2014 and 1964, pop and rock and jazz and folk and R&B and classical and punk, world famous and unimaginably obscure. Every week, vinyl workgroup convenes to search through the depths of the WOBC vinyl vault and find some hidden gems you otherwise would never discover. Here’s a recent sampling of the best we’ve found.

Luther Allison: “The Little Red Rooster” from Bad News is Coming (1973). Arkansan blues guitarist – began by playing with Howlin’ Wolf and Freddie King in the late 50s, eventually found himself as one of the few blues artists signed to Motown in the early 70s, when he recorded his album.

BadNewsIsComing

Continue reading Finds from the WOBC Vault: March 2014

Who ARE Nick Hennies and Bromp Treb?

Nick Hennies, Bromp Treb, and the Stranahan-Miralia duo are playing at Fairchild Chapel on March 17 at 9:30 PM. FB Event.

Nick Hennies

Why should I watch a man play nothing but a single snare drum for twenty minutes? Because that man is Nick Hennies.

Nick Hennies is about as versatile as someone who bangs on things  for a living can get. Classically trained, he studied with renowned contemporary music guru Steve Schick at UC-San Diego. He then found himself in Austin, where he co-founded critically acclaimed band The Weird Weeds. Meanwhile, he also became known for his performances of experimental contemporary music by composers like John Cage, Alvin Lucier, Peter Ablinger, and even revered outsider artist Jandek. He’s also a composer in his own right. So saying Nick Hennies would be doing nothing but playing a single snare drum for twenty minutes is like saying you’d be doing nothing but listening to a single Pink Floyd album for twenty minutes. Yes, I am saying that a single snare drum can equal a Pink Floyd album in depth and complexity. If you’re not a huge fan of Pink Floyd, it will surpass it easily. Just don’t expect him to do any covers.

If Nick Hennies is the stoic liberator of hidden sounds, Bromp Treb is the court jester peddling the wonderful and weird. Perhaps you know him as a member of celebrated avant-rock masters Fat Worm of Error (Oberlin visitors just a couple years back). Bromp Treb is a surprise at every turn, a ritual-like hodgepodge of noises and dramatic gestures, mixed up so much until you’re not sure what is man and what is machine.

Vinyl Finds from the WOBC Vault

Every week, vinyl workgroup dives into the deepest depths of the labyrinthine world of WOBC’s vinyl vault. The collection, stretching back to the 60s, is of a rare kind – it doesn’t just have the hits and the classics, it has the albums singles companies wanted to be hits, the double albums they wanted to be classics, the strange compilations, the complete musical failures that quickly went into obscurity, the undiscovered gems that never saw much light. Here are some particular interesting ones we picked out – and DJs, if you want to play these on your show, you can find them on the “best of vinyl” shelf in the public affairs room.

“Daydreamers” by Nelories, off of Daisy (1994, Sugarfrost) | Japanese alt-indie-ACCORDION-pop duo from the 90s. Weren’t expecting that part, were you.

nelories

“Elephant Stone (7″ Single Version)” by the Stone Roses (1988, Silvertone) | An acid indie rock jam.

Stone+Roses+-+Elephant+Stone+-+2nd+Issue+-+12"+RECORD_MAXI+SINGLE-109166

“Holotelani” by Nelcy Sedibe off of The Indestructible Beat of Soweto (1985, Shanachie Records) | An important compilation from the 80s of a wide variety of South African artists – never disappoints!

Various-World+Music+-+The+Indestructible+Beat+Of+Soweto+Volume+One+-+LP+RECORD-543043

Soul to Soul (1971, Atlantic) | Soundtrack from a film of a 1971 concert in Ghana of American soul, R&B, and rock musicians – Wilson Pickett, Ike & Tina Turner, Santana, Roberta Flack, The Staples Singers and more.

9229

Vinyl Pot Pourri

James-Anya-TVParty

from Sivan Silver-Swartz, co-vinyl director:

James Siegfried is better known as James Chance or James White–one of the seminal figures of late-70s/early-80s New York No Wave, along with people like Lydia Lunch and Arto Lindsay. In the early days, he had two groups and personas going on–James Chance & the Contortions and James White & the Blacks. Both were bizarre amalgams of free jazz and R&B, the former a little more funkier, the latter a bit more disco. And so, we found ourselves with a great vault find, the 1982 album from the White & Black side of things called “Sax Maniac.” “James White & the Blacks,” “Sax Maniac,” songs with titles like “Sax Machine” and “Irresistible Impulse”–too good to be true, right? It features, rather than a bunch of No Wave people, some actual R&B session musicians and singers of the time. Compared to his earlier work, it’s a bit less wild, a bit less disorienting, a bit less rough. But don’t worry, it’s still revolutionary and transgressive and all of that good stuff.

from Ryan Jennings, workgroup member:

I found the first four Robbie Basho records in the vault yesterday at vinyl workgroup. It’s sweet to imagine WOBC being sent the records upon release, but who knows how all four stayed intact since they’re pretty rare and expensive on e-bay. Robbie Basho was a cool dude on John Fahey’s Takoma Records, and he and Fahey went to college together (wow, just like us!) And the record’s mostly 12-string solo guitar American Primitivism and, like, folk music I guess, but he studied with Ali Akbar Khan, the #1 sarod master of the world, and changed his name in honor of the Japanese poet Matsuo Basho. He sings on a lot too, but my favorite Basho record, “Falconer’s Arm I,” which is in the vault right now, is a masterpiece and completely instrumental. A very detailed and coherent record, each song represents a unique and beautiful story. “Babs” is a favorite track but I seriously recommend everyone to check out this haunting album on par with any Fahey and more accessible than a long winded raga!
Basho died in a freak chiropractic accident in the 80s.

from Olivia Simuoli, workgroup member:

This semester, I found in the vaults German progressive and space rock group Nektar’s concept album, “Remember the Future.”  Recorded in 1973, the album features one song divided into two parts and tells the tale of the evolution of man through the eyes of a bird.  The story begins with life originating in the sea and touches on other major milestones, such as man’s discovery of fire and invention of the wheel.  The climax of the album occurs when mankind starts to wonder whether he is alone in the world or if there is some “Supreme Being” out there as well.  Despite what may seem to be clichéd and at times bizarre subject matter, the album on the whole is pretty unique and interesting and has a good space rock feel with some nice funk undertones.

Selections From Vinyl Workgroup, 4.13.13

Tired of listening to the same music over and over again? Maybe Vinyl Workgroup can help! Check out some of our most recent selections from the WOBC vaults.

wheatstrawsuite

The Seeker // Rahsaan Roland Kirk & Vibration Society // Rahsaan Rahsaan

This Girl Is Hot // Sarah Dash // Ooh La La

Jump For Joy // Coco Taylor // Jump For Joy

Listen To The Sound // The Dillards // Wheatstraw Suite

Keep On Pushin’ // Gene Clark // Early L.A. Sessions

Sliding Delta & Trouble, I’ve Had It All My Days // Mississippi John Hurt // Early Bluesmen of Newport

Vinyl Workgroup Recommends…

url

Attached are some of the latest tracks unearthed by Vinyl Workgroup. Have a listen, and maybe fall in love with something new.

Misty Eyes by Richard Lloyd (Alchemy)

Screwed Up by Sparks (Big Beat)

Shine a Light by Spiritualized (Lazer Guided Melodies)

Sons of Stone by The People’s Temple (Sons of Stone)

London Town by Chris Spedding (The Only Lick I Know)

Daddy’s Gonna Treat You Right by Commander Cody and His Lost Planet (Ozone

Want us to digitize a track or full record from the station’s extensive vinyl vault? E-mail vinyl@wobc.org.